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Black History Month through creativity in the classroom

February 10, 2021 | Contributor: Cricut Blog Team

Teachers make a difference everyday. We appreciate teachers; we’re inspired by teachers. And, we love seeing how projects created by our community of teachers are accompanying education in the classroom. In honor of Black History Month and our journey to continuously celebrate diversity, we spoke with a few teachers that shared relevant projects with us and asked them how it’s helped in their classrooms.

Find their inspirational projects below for classroom doors and bulletin boards.


Classroom doors

“Hidden Figures” classroom door

As a math teacher, the film, “Hidden Figures,” impacted not only the teacher behind the door, but her students as well.

The door illustrates a quote from Katherine Johnson’s book, “Katherine Johnson knew once you took the first step, anything was possible.”

Project by Tracey Campbell | 6th grade math | Pinebluff, AR

The students were so excited and started to say how they knew who she was and [how] they too watched the movie [after I finished the door]. We also discussed a quote from the book that’s on the door. I discussed with them what the ladder represented. How taking one step on the ladder leads to your next one and so on.

Tracey Campbell

“Love Everyone” classroom door

This project helped celebrate differences and similarities in the classroom. It also became quite the conversation starter.

Project by Ashley Homann | Preschool | Monticello, IL

Many of my 4 year-olds would walk past and ask who the person was which was a great conversation starter for us to discuss who they were and their impact on the world today! The really fun part of the door was catching parents walking by and hearing them discussing it with their children.

Ashley Homann

Additional school inspiration from Ashley…

Ashley Homann - Bulletin Board Project
Ashley Homann - Bulletin Board Project
Ashley Homann - Bulletin Board Project

Ruby Bridges Valentine classroom door

To accompany Ruby Bridges, these “conversation” hearts were examples from students of influential figures from Black history.

Project by Tori-Grace McCarley| English Secondary Education | Middle Tennessee State University

During Study Hall my students participated in a Menti, which is like unanimous online sticky notes. The students gave me names of people whom they thought were important to represent during black history month. I also added a few black authors to relate it to English Language Arts (ELA), like Toni Morrison, Zora Neal Hurston, Maya Angelo, etc.

Tori-Grace McCarley

“Because they were” classroom door

This project spurred interest in Black history.

Project by Jennifer Phillips| K-5 Special Education | Fort Wayne Community Schools

Jennifer Phillips - classroom door for Black History Month

One student asked about who a few of the people were which caused us to learn a little about abolitionists, Frederick Douglas and George Washington.

Jennifer Phillips

Alma Woodsey Thomas classroom door

Artist Alma Woodsey Thomas’ quote, “The use of color in my paintings is of paramount importance to me. Through color I have sought to concentrate on beauty and happiness, rather than on man’s inhumanity to man,” is highlighted in vinyl (cut by a Cricut machine, of course), but students schoolwide contributed to this door for Black History Month.

Project by Rachel Petrucelli | Elementary School Art Teacher | Atlanta, GA

Rachel Petrucelli - Alma Thomas classroom door for Black History Month

This was a special moment for students because everyone felt as though they were a part of something and was able to make their mark.

Rachel Petrucelli

A few closeups and accompanying projects…


MLK and more classroom door

This door has not only provided conversation for Black History Month, but it has also factored into many lessons throughout the year for students.

Project by Jessica Manus| private PreK | Nashville, TN

Jessica Manus Black History Classroom Door

This is an every year lesson for my classroom. We started with segregation. Children asked for a definition when we discussed the “I Have a Dream” speech. This led to Jackie Robinson. And, this week is a heavier week. We’re discussing Harriet Tubman and The Underground Railroad, where I used my Cricut to cut ‘squares’ for our paper Freedom Quilt. We’ve also put up vinyl stars in our room as our ‘guides’ from the stories ‘The Freedom Quilt’ and ‘Follow the Drinking Gourd.’

Jessica Manus

Bulletin boards

ABCs of Black History bulletin board

These ABCs are incorporated into phonics using everyday objects to teach students in a unique way. A student fascinated by a wig sparked conversation about Madam C.J. Walker and the use of haircare products. A student who took initiative in assisting his classmates spurred the topic of leadership and provided a lesson on being a leader like Martin L. King and Malcom X.

Project by Eboni Person | Communication and Social Skills (CSS) Paraprofessional | Bayview Elementary, Jacksonville, FL

Eboni Pearson - ABCs of Black History Bulletin Board

The board has become a stop and learn from both students and staff throughout the school. I did not think this board would reach any further than our CSS hallway and educate others daily.

Eboni Person

It feels like you are reading a book. So each morning I turn a page to learn something new. This is a reminder that there is a teachable moment each day.

Fellow teacher at Eboni’s school

To me this is ingenious. You see, she teaches the babies who are learning their ABC’s. It ties to her curriculum and Black History month.

Fellow paraprofessional at Eboni’s school

“Reach for the moon” bulletin board

This board was inspired by math and science teacher (and historical Black figure) Katherine Johnson. 

Project by Ja’Kyrah Thomas | 5th grade math and science | Lake Charles, LA

Ja'Kyrah Thomas - Katherine Johnson BHM Bulletin Board

My students were really interested in the board. I’m big on inspirational quotes, so it for perfectly… It was the perfect opportunity to show the movie “Hidden Figures”. They LOVED it! If anyone has questions about her, my students can ‘give the tea.’

Ja’Kyrah Thomas

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